Who are Myanmar’s Rohingya?Sovereignty and Strategic Denial in Australia’s Antarctic PolicyUN Peacekeeping: At an Inflection Point

LOCATION

TIME/DATE

HOSTED BY

  • Rohingya

    Who are Myanmar’s Rohingya?

    Date Thu, 04 May 2017
    Time 18:00 – 19:30
    Location AIIA Victoria, Dyason House, 124 Jolimont Road, East Melbourne, 3002

    Speaker:  Ronan Lee, Deakin University, Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation

    The Rohingya people - Myanmar’s Muslim minority - are facing an existential crisis. Amid rising international acknowledgement that Myanmar's democratic transition has stalled, gruesome reports have emerged of Myanmar's military subjecting the Rohingya to a campaign of organised violence; targeting civilians with extra-judicial killings, beatings, burning of villages, sexual violence and arbitrary detention.

    More >
  • Antarctica

    Sovereignty and Strategic Denial in Australia’s Antarctic Policy

    Date Wed, 10 May 2017
    Time 18:00 – 19:30
    Location Dyason House, 124 Jolimont Rd, East Melbourne
    Speaker: Dr Daniel Bray, La Trobe University


    Antarctica is one of the most sought-after and disputed land masses on the planet. With seven nations currently maintaining a territorial claim, and 53 nations being party to the Antarctic Treaty System (ATS), the governance of Antarctica continues to be highly topical issue in international affairs.


    More >
  • Un peacekeepers

    UN Peacekeeping: At an Inflection Point

    Date Tue, 23 May 2017
    Time 18:00 – 19:30
    Location Dyason House, 124 Jolimont Rd, East Melbourne
    Speaker: Dr. Charles T. Hunt, Vice Chancellor’s Senior Research Fellow, RMIT University


    Today two-thirds of the UN’s peacekeepers are deployed in places where there is little or no peace to keep. More than ever before they are expected to protect vulnerable civilians when host state authorities are unable or unwilling to do so. In response, a new generation of missions in Mali, the Central African Republic, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo have been characterised by increased authorisation to use force and the implementation of stabilisation strategies.


    These more robust mandates blur the lines between peacekeeping, stabilisation, counter-terrorism, atrocity prevention and state-building. Such ‘mission creep’ presents principled and practical challenges for those authorising and implementing these mandates with implications for the future reputation, substance and viability of UN peacekeeping. However, the consequences of these shifts remain underexplored.


    More >

Upcoming Event